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What Queen's is Doing

As we are facing a COVID-19 pandemic, helping to prevent the spread of the coronavirus is more critical than ever. We have implemented measures in our hospitals and clinics to address COVID-19 with the goal to keep our patients, visitors, staff and providers healthy and safe.

Infoline

Queen's has created an informational hotline for those looking to get their medical questions answered about COVID-19. That includes being able to talk to a Registered Nurse. The hotline number is 808-691-2619. It is available 24 hours a day, 7 days week.

Queen's Medical Center and Queen's Island Urgent Care

Patients at The Queen's Medical Center (Punchbowl and West Oahu) and Queen's Island Urgent Care will undergo routine travel and temperature screenings upon entry for possible coronavirus infection. If a patient screens positive (symptoms + travel from locations of concern as identified by the CDC, or exposure to a known case),rapid masking and isolation will be implemented until further evaluation with Hawaii Department of Health is completed.

Diagnostic Laboratory Services

Diagnostic Laboratory Services (DLS) is providing testing services through a mainland reference laboratory for COVID-19, and is working closely with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to secure approval for providing local testing. 

Until the FDA approves local testing, DLS will continue to work with one of its mainland reference laboratories who have already received FDA approval.

Temperature Screening Checkpoints

At our Punchbowl and West Oahu hospitals, temperature screenings are being conducted for all staff and visitors. This is in response to increased cases of the flu, although it is being used as a precaution against COVID-19.

Anyone who exhibits any of the following signs or symptoms of flu are not allowed on the units:

  • Fever >100.5F or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuff nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults)