Facility Dogs

The Queen’s Medical Center is home to Yoda and Ipo – two furry friends who are the stars of the Facility Dogs program at Queen’s. 

Scientific research has shown that a patient's interaction with an animal can provide positive physical and emotional benefits. It can reduce stress levels and invoke a sense of well-being.

The Facility Dog Program acts as a catalyst to motivate patients to help themselves. A patient will happily take a dog for a walk, or throw the animal a ball, forgetting the pain for a little while and moving closer to going home.

Benefits of this type of animal-assisted therapy include motivating patients to:

  • Forget their discomfort or pain
  • Interact more with others
  • Improve their mood
  • Improve their interactions with family and staff
  • Do things that may be a struggle, such as eating, taking medication or waiting
  • Get up, move, and walk
  • Participate in therapy (physical, occupational and speech)

Our Facility Dogs and owners are trained and certified. The dogs brighten the day for just about everyone including patients, visitors and staff alike.

Queen’s works with Assistance Dogs of Hawaii, a nonprofit organization that provides children and adults with disabilities and hospitals with professionally trained dogs that ensures both the animal and handler have successfully completed pet therapy training.

Queen's also employs comfort pets through Volunteer Services and is equipped with a Security Dog unit specifically at The Queen's Medical Center - West Oahu campus.